Ministries

Taizé Services

Taizé services are held at 7:00 pm on the second Sunday of each month, October through April.

These services offer a time for meditation, reflection, and  renewal through music, brief words, and silence. Come sing, light a candle, and nurture your spirit during this nontraditional worship experience - and bring a friend!

There is a rehearsal from 6 to 6:45 pm for singers who would like to learn the harmonies to the chants we will sing.

At a Taizé Service
by Lyn B, Concord UU Member

When you walk into the church for a Taizé service, peaceful instrumental music is playing. The sanctuary is dark and hushed, the light coming mostly from candles, grouped on the chancel table and twinkling in the windows. Greetings automatically come out whispered, and a mood of quiet contemplation prevails. For me, the darkness, candlelight, and quiet invoke a feeling of sacred space that is almost other worldly, the way I feel at a Christmas Eve service, or when I enter a huge cathedral. Although I was in the same physical room a few hours earlier, the atmosphere is entirely different from the sunlit energy of a Sunday morning service.

The service consists primarily of short, simple songs sung as repeated meditations, and silence. Once the chalice is lit at the beginning of the service, the leader takes a seat in the pews and the rest of the service is guided by projected lyrics and images. Spoken words are kept to a minimum – the leader reads a few short selections focused on peace, love, and compassion. Worshippers have an opportunity to speak a name or a couple of words into the silence. For me, a notably word-oriented person, this has the effect of helping me better hear my heart over the constant chatter from my head. I come out feeling better balanced.

Although the Taizé community where this service style originated is Christian, Michael has created a Unitarian Universalist liturgy that would, I believe, feel equally welcoming to all whose beliefs include faith in the healing and transforming power of love. I hope these services will attract people from other faith communities in our area in the months to come, and I certainly urge all of you who haven’t experienced a Taizé service yet to come join us.